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. the attacks happened at a time when tensions are high between the u.s. and india's ah enemy pakistan. reza, what is the strategy of multiple bombs in multiple locations? tell us about both the motive and the likely perpetrators of these attacks. >> well, it certainly bears the hallmarks of a group like lashkar-e-taiba, of course, the group responsible for the devastating 2008 attack on mumbai. at the same time, i think investigators are saying that the relatively small scale of this attack and the fact that the bombs were rather crude. there were actually ieds, martin, incates that it could be an indigenous terror organization, an organization known as the indian mujahadin which may or may not have links to lashkar-e-taiba but that remains to be seen. no one has accepted responsibility just yet. >> you say these were small devices, but 21 people killed, and at least 113 injured is not small. secretary of state hillary clinton is scheduled to visit india next week, but the united states is currently in a very tense situation with india's rival pakistan, as you know. does the u.s. have to tr
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
terrorist through security. even with bin laden's debt at the compound in may, pakistan is the base for the al-qaeda core leadership, including ayad allawi the egyptian doctor who replaced the al-qaeda leader. pakistan's ability to track known and suspected terrorists is substandard. >> it is stunning that pakistan which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism does not even share finger print data within the own government. >> while information sharing and passport security improved in the u.s., former homeland security official says the disparity overseas remains a serious problem. >> the travel documents are the same as weapons, terrorists that can't carry off the plot without them. if i give us a grade abroad with the partners, some of is it out of our control, we're probably closer to a "c." >> some former intelligence officials say the u.s. should use leverage to encourage standards. for some nations it's resource problems. for otherssh it's refusal to cooperate. >> bret: thank you. the speaker of the house joins me live in studio exclusively after the break. [
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
that occurred originally back in the '40s between india and pakistan, a couple hundred muslims live inside -- >> millions. that's okay. >> live inside india and there are extremist groups with india as opposed to pakistani base that go over to india responsible for similar small-scale attacks. so nobody is clear yet who it is, but i think you're right. the fact that indian officials didn't immediately blame or cast doubt that it was pakistan suggests that they don't think it is. >> and also you just made a point we were talking ak. 200 million muslims in country of india makes india one of the largest -- the largest muslim country in the world? >> exactly. indonesia and india, countries with the largest number of muslims in the world. indians often present that evidence to westerners. >> sure. >> saying we know how to work closely with our multiple populations. we're a large democracy and see how things go so well. it doesn't always go so well in that country. >> move to syria. both in new york and washington we're obsess with the debt talks and defaulting and obviously for important reaso
less than that. but there is a move to cut some of that funding. most interestingly enough on pakistan, because of the tension in u.s.-pakistani relations in the wake of the death of osama bin laden so that has been on the table. but as far as a percentage of what goes out, it's relatively small. the interesting thing, though, here, is that there is -- have put tax increases on the table. they've put some defense spending on the table. you didn't see that years ago, that they were willing to cut defense. so that's significant. but foreign aid is something that has been discussed of pairing back. host: "the daily caller" has a story about ron paul, as our caller and also -- ron paul calls on supporters to lobby leadership for no compromise. ron paul blasted top house republicans for lack of called on supporters to pressure top g.o.p. officials not to cut a back room deal with president obama. in an e-mail sent thursday evening to supporters of his presidential bid he couraged backers to help republican leaders make up their mind. the republican leadership is us is exceptible -- suscepti
. first, a news update. >> 17 past the hour. pakistan intelligence officials say 38 alleged militants have been killed by three suspected u.s. missiles in northwestern pakistan. this is in less than 12 hours. the attacks come two days after the obama administration suspended more than one-third of u.s. military aid to pakistan, about $800 million. the attacks indicate the white house has no intention of stopping the drone program. syria is accusing the u.s. a provocation after secretary of state hillary clinton said the president had lost legitimacy and was "not indispensable." this is one day after hamas attacked embassies. violent uprisings have been happening over the last four months as rebels tried to oust president assaad and and his family's 40-year rule. in the states, the gao says the government is making it more difficult to detect medicare fraud. in a report to be released today, they say the government systems for analyzing medicare and medicaid data are "inaccurate and underused." fraudulent claims are between $60 billion and $90 billion per year. we will hear more about that
persecuted in places like pakistan, and we help christians who are suffering throughout the middle east. >> how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business that donates to you? >> of course. but, you see, a lot of the times, if you disclose information of who you are helping, it ends up biting them. >> reporter: he leads us to his manager who was down the hall selling the anti-islam books. when cnn had questions about the high ranks on the board of advisers, he said to get the number from davies. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i am trying to think. the names have gone blank. they will come back to me in a second. major general -- ah, i can't -- the four-star -- there was a three-star general at the air force, irish name, thomas -- i usually know these by hearts. >> reporter: davies did come up with one name, a pilot but no contact details despite repeated requests from cnn. we made calls to the individual anyway, but he never called us back. the group's public tax forms lists only davies and a real estate develope
certainly hurt the al-qaeda terrorist organization, in pakistan and afghanistan. but anwar al-awlaki is alive and well in yemen and he is planning additional attacks against americans. is the franchise there now the lead in al-qaeda and how dangerous and what can we do? >> al-qaeda is somewhat diffuse in the islamist most of the time. yemen a fertile ground. it does seem to be emerging as headquarters of sorts. yemen as a state doesn't exist right now. it was an iffy topic when it had a president but it essentially doesn't right now. so al-qaeda finding an open door. president obama came out and said the tide of war is receding but nobody gave that message to the islamist terrorists. we this had the christmas day bombing, not the one on the flight but the on other one on fed ex shipments. >> gregg: speaking of terrorists let's talk about libya and moammar khadafy who says he is willing to talk to america but he refuses to give up his position. so what is the point of talking to the guy? >> this has been going for five months. people have said that khadafy is losing or close to
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
get this. a doctor has been arrested in pakistan for trying to get osama bin laden. we have the details. >> this story sounds like it's straight out of a spy novel. a pakistani security official telling cnn a pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up a plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official, this doctor, staged a face vaccination campaign. offering free vaccinations and shots to the children and residents where the bin laden compound was eventually located. this doctor hired two nurses who went from home to home. and the plan was to get to the bin laden children and somehow extract some blood or use the syringe from the vaccinations to match their dna samples with dna samples from bin laden's sister who passed away last year in boston, massachusetts. we haven't been able to verify if these nurses made it into the bin laden compound. we did track down one of the nurses who was allegedly involved in this plot over the phone and she repeatedly told us that she cannot speak about this matter. we also spoke to some
violence erupting in pakistan, gunmen in the streets of karachi, opening fire, leaving seven dead and more than two dozen injured. >>> dozens of suspects connected to the mexican mafia in custody after a huge gang raid in california. the mexican mafia, considered the oldest and most powerful prison gang in the u.s. >>> astronauts on board atlantis, international space station as well, getting their morning wake-up call today. listen to this: >> ♪ >> ♪ if you believed. >> ♪ >> ♪ they put a man on the moon. >> ♪ >> ♪ good morning atlantis! this is michael stripe from r.e.m. we wish you much success on your mission and thank all the women and men at nasa who have worked on shuttle for three decades, from earth, a very good morning to you. >> ♪ >> ♪ >> ♪ >> ♪ bill: how cool is that, huh? sir elton yesterday did that. martha: wouldn't that be cool, wake up up every morning and give you a call? >> bill: we're going to talk to them next week and let you know how -- know how they're doing on the last mission. so stay tuned for that. martha: and in court, we are getting reports
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)